Remedial English Test Series 81

Remedial English Test Series 81

                                       

 Identify  the ONE mistake in each line and make corrections    (1 mark for each correct answer. Total score   ___ )  

01 What began as a family feuds is now a fight for the very soul of the Samajwadi Party. If power and position
02 were all that mattered, SP supremo Mulayam Singh might have been able to more evenly distributes the loaves
03 of office and quick end the crisis engulfing his party. But his son Akhilesh Yadav has now taken the fight to
04 another plane,  debunking the old guard and project  his own actions as those taken in the interest of the
05 larger public good. This time the Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister’s revolt is direct at the very manner in which
06 the SP is being run and, by implication, he is challenging what he perceive  as the subversion of the party’s
07 founding values. But if he is go to ‘liberate’ the SP from the feudal old guard, he will need to do much
08 more. When Akhilesh Yadav objected to the party leaderships proposal for the merger with the SP of the
09 Quami Ekta Dal,   led by the gangster-politician Mukhtar Ansari, he was not question the mobilisation of
10 votes on communal lines but the building of support blocks at the risk of being perceive  as a party that is
11 soft on crime. Similar, his opposition to the re-entry of Amar Singh into the party was not — as it arguably
12 should have been — an attempt to delink the SP from the perils of corporate funding, but an effort to distant
13 it from seeming to be close to wheeler-dealers. On both occasion  his interventions seemed little more than a
14 part of a image-building exercise. Akhilesh Yadav may have become the new, urbane face of the party, at the
15 head of a generation of technology-savvy youth that speak the language of progress and development. But
16 he has so far not been able to change it in any substantive way. The Chief Minister know  he cannot do
17 without the SP’s organisation structures in an Assembly election, just months away. But he also seems to
18 have realised that he could not possibly benefit from the brand of brash politics characterise  by his father
19 and uncle Shivpal Yadav without being tainted by it. By strike out on his own, Akhilesh Yadav is now
20 hope  he would gain acceptance beyond the traditional vote banks of the SP. But the intra-party quarrels are
21 unlike   to have inspired confidence among the public of the SP’s ability to provide stability and good
22 governance. Yadav Jr will be judge  not on how he distanced himself from the lathi-wielding criminal
23 elements of the SP, but on how he maintained law and order. Similar, not on how he managed the SP’s
24 leadership, but on how he governed for five years. After all, in the Assembly poll, he will be fight  against
25 the BJP’s Narendra Modi and the BSPs Mayawati, not his father and uncle (The Hindu, 2 Jan 2017).

         KEY TO Remedial English Test Series 81   Note the correct answers below

01 What began as a family feud is now a fight for the very soul of the Samajwadi Party. If power and position
02 were all that mattered, SP supremo Mulayam Singh might have been able to more evenly distribute the loaves
03 of office and quickly end the crisis engulfing his party. But his son Akhilesh Yadav has now taken the fight to
04 another plane,  debunking the old guard and projecting his own actions as those taken in the interest of the
05 larger public good. This time the Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister’s revolt is directed at the very manner in which
06 the SP is being run and, by implication, he is challenging what he perceives as the subversion of the party’s
07 founding values. But if he is going to ‘liberate’ the SP from the feudal old guard, he will need to do much
08 more. When Akhilesh Yadav objected to the party leadership’s proposal for the merger with the SP of the
09 Quami Ekta Dal,   led by the gangster-politician Mukhtar Ansari, he was not questioning the mobilisation of
10 votes on communal lines but the building of support blocks at the risk of being perceived as a party that is
11 soft on crime. Similarly, his opposition to the re-entry of Amar Singh into the party was not — as it arguably
12 should have been — an attempt to delink the SP from the perils of corporate funding, but an effort to distance
13 it from seeming to be close to wheeler-dealers. On both occasions his interventions seemed little more than a
14 part of an image-building exercise. Akhilesh Yadav may have become the new, urbane face of the party, at the
15 head of a generation of technology-savvy youth that speaks the language of progress and development. But
16 he has so far not been able to change it in any substantive way. The Chief Minister knows he cannot do
17 without the SP’s organisational structures in an Assembly election, just months away. But he also seems to
18 have realised that he could not possibly benefit from the brand of brash politics characterised by his father
19 and uncle Shivpal Yadav without being tainted by it. By striking out on his own, Akhilesh Yadav is now
20 hoping he would gain acceptance beyond the traditional vote banks of the SP. But the intra-party quarrels are
21 unlikely to have inspired confidence among the public of the SP’s ability to provide stability and good
22 governance. Yadav Jr will be judged not on how he distanced himself from the lathi-wielding criminal
23 elements of the SP, but on how he maintained law and order. Similarly, not on how he managed the SP’s
24 leadership, but on how he governed for five years. After all, in the Assembly poll, he will be fighting against
25 the BJP’s Narendra Modi and the BSP’s Mayawati, not his father and uncle (The Hindu, 2 Jan 2017).