Remedial English Test Series 63

Remedial English Test Series 63

      Identify  the ONE mistake in each line and make corrections    (1 mark for each correct answer. Total score   ___ )

01 Have you ever thought about what it’s like for the animals and birds living in a forest when it’s clear to make way for a
02 palm oil plantation? It’s similar to finding your home being demolished brick by bricks. First the loggers come in and take
03 away trees of commerce  value. Species such as the orangutan, which rely on tree cover, will retreat to the forest
04 boundaries, perhaps venturing out into the logged forest while there is still remnants of habitat left. After the loggers
05 come the diggers. The heavy machinery plough  the rest of the forest much like an arable field, clearing any remaining
06 vegetation before preparing the ground for the oil palm trees.  This clearing process can take as long as two year,
07 during which time much of the forests wildlife will disappear. “The thing about deforestation is that it doesn’t kill
08 animals, it kill  trees. Therefore the animals that are mobile will go somewhere,” explains Rob Ewers, an ecologist at
09 Imperial College London. The exodus create  a “crowding” affect, where the remaining fragments of forest or steep
10 slopes that cannot be logged become flooded with wildlife seeking refuge. However, these fragments are not usual
11 large enough to support all the wild  that inhabited the forest. After an initial surge in biodiversity, most of the species
12 either move, starve or die, says Ewers.  Forest fragments, left after clearance for oil palm, could supports  a wide variety of
13 biodiversity. Photograph: Chien C Lee On average, just 15% of the species recorded in primary forest is found in oil
14 palm plantations. But what if these forest fragments were expanded or redesign  to encourage more species to survive
15 and migrate through palm oil landscapes? For the past five years, Ewers has been leading a study call  the Safe project
16 to answer this question. With a team of researcher  on the island of Borneo, Malaysia – a most biodiverse region
17 – he is studying the impact of different types and size  of forest fragments on wildlife populations. With the support of a
18 major palm oil company, Malaysia-base  Sime Darby, which Ewers says has no involvement in the study, the researchers
19 have been given exclusive access to a forest site being clear for palm oil conversion. They are assessing the impact of
20 different types of forest fragments, include  continuous patches of forest, so-called wildlife corridors, that allow wildlife
21 to move in and out of plantations. With additional access to a unlogged forest site and a palm oil plantation site being
22 cleared without fragments as control sites, the total land area encompass  8,000 hectares (an area larger than
23 Manhattan), making it one of the world’s biggest ecological experiment ( The Guardian, 20 Oct 16).

     KEY TO Remedial English Test Series 63   Note the correct answers below

01 Have you ever thought about what it’s like for the animals and birds living in a forest when it’s cleared to make way for a
02 palm oil plantation? It’s similar to finding your home being demolished brick by brick. First the loggers come in and take
03 away trees of commercial value. Species such as the orangutan, which rely on tree cover, will retreat to the forest
04 boundaries, perhaps venturing out into the logged forest while there are still remnants of habitat left. After the loggers
05 come the diggers. The heavy machinery ploughs the rest of the forest much like an arable field, clearing any remaining
06 vegetation before preparing the ground for the oil palm trees.  This clearing process can take as long as two years,
07 during which time much of the forest’s wildlife will disappear. “The thing about deforestation is that it doesn’t kill
08 animals, it kills trees. Therefore the animals that are mobile will go somewhere,” explains Rob Ewers, an ecologist at
09 Imperial College London. The exodus creates a “crowding” affect, where the remaining fragments of forest or steep
10 slopes that cannot be logged become flooded with wildlife seeking refuge. However, these fragments are not usually
11 large enough to support all the wildlife that inhabited the forest. After an initial surge in biodiversity, most of the species
12 either move, starve or die, says Ewers.  Forest fragments, left after clearance for oil palm, could support a wide variety of
13 biodiversity. Photograph: Chien C Lee On average, just 15% of the species recorded in primary forest are found in oil
14 palm plantations. But what if these forest fragments were expanded or redesigned to encourage more species to survive
15 and migrate through palm oil landscapes? For the past five years, Ewers has been leading a study called the Safe project
16 to answer this question. With a team of researchers on the island of Borneo, Malaysia – a most biodiverse region
17 – he is studying the impact of different types and sizes of forest fragments on wildlife populations. With the support of a
18 major palm oil company, Malaysia-based Sime Darby, which Ewers says has no involvement in the study, the researchers
19 have been given exclusive access to a forest site being cleared for palm oil conversion. They are assessing the impact of
20 different types of forest fragments, including continuous patches of forest, so-called wildlife corridors, that allow wildlife
21 to move in and out of plantations. With additional access to an unlogged forest site and a palm oil plantation site being
22 cleared without fragments as control sites, the total land area encompasses 8,000 hectares (an area larger than
23 Manhattan), making it one of the world’s biggest ecological experiments ( The Guardian, 20 Oct 16).