Remedial English Test Series 59

Remedial English Test Series 59

  Identify  the ONE mistake in each line and make corrections    (1 mark for each correct answer. Total score   ___ )

 01 There has been, in recent time, an unusually public conflict between the judiciary and the executive over the shortage
02 of judges in various high courts. Amidst the perception that the situation has reach  crisis proportions and is
03 threaten  to cripple judicial functioning, it is somewhat disconcerting that as many as 43 names out of a list of 77
04 recommend  for appointment have not found favour with the Centre. It has informed the Supreme Court that these
05 names require reconsideration by the collegium. The Centre contend that it has cleared 34 appointments, and that
06 there is no file pend  with it. It appears to have taken the cue from the remarks of the Chief Justice of India, T.S.
07 Thakur, that it is better to sent back the names it is not happy with rather than keep the entire list pending. The
08 collegium is now oblige  to return to its recommendations and examine the government’s specific objections about the
09 suitable of each candidate. This may further delay the filling up of vacancies, which have been well above the 400-
10 mark at the high court level for some times  now. The executive, of course, is bound to make the appointments if the
11 collegium reiterate  the recommendations, but it is quite unusual that such a large number of names should be
12 returned. It raise  the question whether larger differences between the judiciary and the executive are playing out in this
13  form. Chief Justice Thakur has been quiet vocal and unsparing in his criticism of the delay on the part of the executive
14 in filling up vacancies. In open court as well as in public forums, he has highlight  the grim situation as the judicial
15 branch is grapple with an enormous work burden, on the one hand, and an exploding docket on the other. The
16 executive feels it is being blame  for delays that are not entirely of its making, and contends that high courts have
17 contributed to this situation by let  vacancies lie unattended. Another possible undercurrent is that the Centre is
18 unhappy over the Supreme Court collegium delaying its nod to the revise  Memorandum of Procedure for judicial
19 appointments send on August 3. Despite the obvious difficulties in the task, the judiciary and the government should
20 attempt to forge a quick consensus on the revise procedure and avert the crisis reaching a flashpoint. The Centre
21 should not be seen as delay  appointments or seeking to dilute judicial primacy, while the judiciary should not be
22 seen as stalling improvements in the appointment process. An agreement is vital to institution  reform. (The Hindu, 16 Nov 16).

  KEY TO Remedial English Test Series 59   Note the correct answers below

 01 There has been, in recent times, an unusually public conflict between the judiciary and the executive over the shortage
02 of judges in various high courts. Amidst the perception that the situation has reached crisis proportions and is
03 threatening to cripple judicial functioning, it is somewhat disconcerting that as many as 43 names out of a list of 77
04 recommended for appointment have not found favour with the Centre. It has informed the Supreme Court that these
05 names require reconsideration by the collegium. The Centre contends that it has cleared 34 appointments, and that
06 there is no file pending with it. It appears to have taken the cue from the remarks of the Chief Justice of India, T.S.
07 Thakur, that it is better to send back the names it is not happy with rather than keep the entire list pending. The
08 collegium is now obliged to return to its recommendations and examine the government’s specific objections about the
09 suitability of each candidate. This may further delay the filling up of vacancies, which have been well above the 400-
10 mark at the high court level for some time now. The executive, of course, is bound to make the appointments if the
11 collegium reiterates the recommendations, but it is quite unusual that such a large number of names should be
12 returned. It raises the question whether larger differences between the judiciary and the executive are playing out in this
13  form. Chief Justice Thakur has been quite vocal and unsparing in his criticism of the delay on the part of the executive
14 in filling up vacancies. In open court as well as in public forums, he has highlighted the grim situation as the judicial
15 branch is grappling with an enormous work burden, on the one hand, and an exploding docket on the other. The
16 executive feels it is being blamed for delays that are not entirely of its making, and contends that high courts have
17 contributed to this situation by letting vacancies lie unattended. Another possible undercurrent is that the Centre is
18 unhappy over the Supreme Court collegium delaying its nod to the revised Memorandum of Procedure for judicial
19 appointments sent on August 3. Despite the obvious difficulties in the task, the judiciary and the government should
20 attempt to forge a quick consensus on the revised procedure and avert the crisis reaching a flashpoint. The Centre
21 should not be seen as delaying appointments or seeking to dilute judicial primacy, while the judiciary should not be
22 seen as stalling improvements in the appointment process. An agreement is vital to institutional reform. (The Hindu, 16 Nov 16).