Remedial English Test Series 50

Remedial English Test Series 50

 Identify  the ONE mistake in each line and make corrections    (1 mark for each correct answer. Total score   ___ )

01 The diminutive nun who journey from a corner of the Ottoman Empire to the slums of India made her one of the
02 most famous women in the world was regard  by many as a saint during her lifetime. “Saint of the Gutters” and
03 “Angel of Mercy” were among the sobriquets she picked up over the course of nearly four decade working with the
04 poor of Kolkata and build  her Missionaries of Charity order into a global force. Those who knew Mother Teresa
05 best, describes  her as someone who loved fun, chocolate and icecream.    Mother Teresa was always far more revered
06 than revile. Millions acclaimed her as an icon of Christian charity and a global symbol of anti-materialism and
07 worthwhile self-sacrifice. India, her adopt  homeland, took her to its heart. “It is natural for every Indian to take
08 pride in Mother Teresa’s canonisation,” Prime Minister Narendra Modi said earlier this week. On her death in 1997,
09 Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II predicted Mother Teresa would “continue to live on in the heart  of all those who have
10 been touched by her selfless  love”. The private Mother Teresa was a more complex personality than she appeared to
11 the world. Behind her gaunt, wrinkle  face lay a troubled soul. For long periods, she was plagued by doubts about
12 the faith that drove her mission to provide comfort to the dying.   She wrote to a priest friend said: “If I ever
13 Becomes  a saint, I will surely be one of darkness; I will continually be absent from heaven — to light the light of those
14 in dark  on Earth.  Baptised Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu, Mother Teresa was born into a Kosovar Albanian family in
15 1910 in Skopje, then part of the Ottoman empire and now the capital of Macedonia. Her father, a businessman who  is
16 involved in the region’s byzantine politics, died when she was eight. By the time she is  12, according to biographers,
17 she was already a regular visitor to Catholic shrines and knew that she want  to dedicate her life to missionary work.
18 At 18, she enroll  in an Irish order, the Sisters of Loreto, spending a brief period in Ireland learning English before her
19 departure for India in 1929. There she spend two decades teaching geography to the children of well-to-do families before
20 founding her own order in 1950. In 1979, her work in the Kolkata’s slums was reward with the Nobel peace prize.
21 In her accept  speech she made a fervent defence of her approach to helping the poor, which was by then coming
22 under increasing critic  scrutiny. To those who said birth control was  vital to combating poverty, she replied that
23 abortion was “direct murder by the mother”. To those who said her Order should promote develop  she replied that
24 she was a missionary, not a social work. In his homily at her canonisation mass on Sunday, Pope Francis hailed her
25 as a beacon for the world. She was, he said, “an eloquence  witness to God’s closeness to the poorest of the poor.”
26 Those who knew Mother Teresa best, describes  her as someone who loved fun, chocolate and  ice-cream. (The Hindu 4 Sept 16)

            KEY TO Remedial English Test Series 50   Note the correct answers below

01 The diminutive nun whose journey from a corner of the Ottoman Empire to the slums of India made her one of the
02 most famous women in the world was regarded by many as a saint during her lifetime. “Saint of the Gutters” and
03 “Angel of Mercy” were among the sobriquets she picked up over the course of nearly four decades working with the
04 poor of Kolkata and building her Missionaries of Charity order into a global force. Those who knew Mother Teresa
05 best, describe her as someone who loved fun, chocolate and ice-cream.    Mother Teresa was always far more revered
06 than reviled. Millions acclaimed her as an icon of Christian charity and a global symbol of anti-materialism and
07 worthwhile self-sacrifice. India, her adopted homeland, took her to its heart. “It is natural for every Indian to take
08 pride in Mother Teresa’s canonisation,” Prime Minister Narendra Modi said earlier this week. On her death in 1997,
09 Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II predicted Mother Teresa would “continue to live on in the hearts of all those who have
10 been touched by her selfless love”. The private Mother Teresa was a more complex personality than she appeared to
11 the world. Behind her gaunt, wrinkled face lay a troubled soul. For long periods, she was plagued by doubts about
12 the faith that drove her mission to provide comfort to the dying.   She wrote to a priest friend saying: “If I ever
13 become a saint, I will surely be one of darkness; I will continually be absent from heaven — to light the light of those
14 in darkness on Earth.  Baptised Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu, Mother Teresa was born into a Kosovar Albanian family in
15 1910 in Skopje, then part of the Ottoman empire and now the capital of Macedonia. Her father, a businessman who  was
16 involved in the region’s byzantine politics, died when she was eight. By the time she was 12, according to biographers,
17 she was already a regular visitor to Catholic shrines and knew that she wanted to dedicate her life to missionary work.
18 At 18, she enrolled in an Irish order, the Sisters of Loreto, spending a brief period in Ireland learning English before her
19 departure for India in 1929. There she spent two decades teaching geography to the children of well-to-do families before
20 founding her own order in 1950. In 1979, her work in the Kolkata’s slums was rewarded with the Nobel peace prize.
21 In her acceptance speech she made a fervent defence of her approach to helping the poor, which was by then coming
22 under increasing critical scrutiny. To those who said birth control was  vital to combating poverty, she replied that
23 abortion was “direct murder by the mother”. To those who said her Order should promote development, she replied that
24 she was a missionary, not a social worker. In his homily at her canonisation mass on Sunday, Pope Francis hailed her
25 as a beacon for the world. She was, he said, “an eloquent  witness to God’s closeness to the poorest of the poor.”
26 Those who knew Mother Teresa best, describe her as someone who loved fun, chocolate and  ice-cream.  (The Hindu 4 Sept 16)