Remedial English Test Series 44

         Remedial English Test Series 44

                                

 Identify  the ONE mistake in each line and make corrections    (1 mark for each correct answer. Total score   ___ )

01  caught sight of them once while we were at luncheon, I now invariable came in late for it, waiting interminably upon
02 the ‘front’ for them to pass; devoting all the short time that I did spent  in the dining-room to interrogating with my
03 eyes its azure wall of glass; rising long before the dessert, so as not to miss them should they have go  out at a
04 different hour, and chafing with irritation at my grandmother, when, with unwitting malevolent, she made me stay
05 with her past the hour that seem  to me propitious. I tried to prolong the horizon by setting my chair aslant; if, by
06 chance, I did caught  sight of no matter which of the girls, since they all partook of the same special essence, it was as
07 if I had seen projected before my face in a shifting, diabolic hallucination, a little of the unfriendly and yet
08 passionately coveted dream which, but a moment ago, had exist  only—where it lay stagnant for all time—in my
09 brain. I was in love with none of them, loving them all, and yet the possible of meeting them was in my daily life the
10 sole element of delight, alone made to burgeon in me those high hopes by which every obstacle is surmount,
11 hopes ending often in fury if I had not see  them. For the moment, these girls eclipsed my grandmother in my
12 affection; the longest journey would at once have seemed attract  to me had it been to a place in which they might
13 be found. It was to them that my thoughts comfortable clung when I supposed myself to be thinking of something
14 else or of nothing. But when, even without know it, I thought of them, they, more unconsciously still, were for me
15 the mountain  blue undulations of the sea, a troop seen passing in outline against the waves. Our most intensive
16 love for a person is always the love, real, of something else as well.” “When the mind has a tendency to dream, it is
17 a mistake to keeping  dreams away from it, to ration its dreams. So long as you distract your mind from its dreams, it
18 will  not know them for what they are; you will always be being taken in by the appear of things, because you
19 will not  have grasped their true nature. If a little dreaming is danger, the cure for it is not to dream less but to
20 dream more,  to dream all the time. One must have a thorough understand of one’s dreams if one is not to be
21 trouble by them;  there is a way of separating one’s dreams from one’s life which so often produces good results
22 that I ask myself  whether one ought not, at all costs, to try it, simply as a prevent, just as certain surgeons make
23 out that we ought,  to avoid the risk of appendicitis later on, to have all our appendices take out when we are
24 children.” Grief that is  caused one by a person with who one is in love can be bitter, even when it is interpolated
25 among preoccupations,  occupations, pleasures in which that person is not direct involved and from which our
26 attention is divert only  now and again to return to it. But when such a grief has its birth—as was now
27 happening—at a moment when the  happiness of seeing that person fill us to the exclusion of all else, the sharp
28 depression that then affects our spirits,  sunny hitherto, sustained and calm, lets loose in us a rage tempest
29 against which we know not whether we are  capable of struggle to the end.  (Proust)

 KEY TO Remedial English Test Series 44   Note the correct answers below

        

01  caught sight of them once while we were at luncheon, I now invariably came in late for it, waiting interminably upon
02 the ‘front’ for them to pass; devoting all the short time that I did spend in the dining-room to interrogating with my
03 eyes its azure wall of glass; rising long before the dessert, so as not to miss them should they have gone out at a
04 different hour, and chafing with irritation at my grandmother, when, with unwitting malevolence, she made me stay
05 with her past the hour that seemed to me propitious. I tried to prolong the horizon by setting my chair aslant; if, by
06 chance, I did catch sight of no matter which of the girls, since they all partook of the same special essence, it was as
07 if I had seen projected before my face in a shifting, diabolical hallucination, a little of the unfriendly and yet
08 passionately coveted dream which, but a moment ago, had existed only—where it lay stagnant for all time—in my
09 brain. I was in love with none of them, loving them all, and yet the possibility of meeting them was in my daily life the
10 sole element of delight, alone made to burgeon in me those high hopes by which every obstacle is surmounted,
11 hopes ending often in fury if I had not seen them. For the moment, these girls eclipsed my grandmother in my
12 affection; the longest journey would at once have seemed attractive to me had it been to a place in which they might
13 be found. It was to them that my thoughts comfortably clung when I supposed myself to be thinking of something
14 else or of nothing. But when, even without knowing it, I thought of them, they, more unconsciously still, were for me
15 the mountainous blue undulations of the sea, a troop seen passing in outline against the waves. Our most intensive
16 love for a person is always the love, really, of something else as well.” “When the mind has a tendency to dream, it is
17 a mistake to keep dreams away from it, to ration its dreams. So long as you distract your mind from its dreams, it
18 will  not know them for what they are; you will always be being taken in by the appearance of things, because you
19 will not  have grasped their true nature. If a little dreaming is dangerous, the cure for it is not to dream less but to
20 dream more,  to dream all the time. One must have a thorough understanding of one’s dreams if one is not to be
21 troubled by them;  there is a way of separating one’s dreams from one’s life which so often produces good results
22 that I ask myself  whether one ought not, at all costs, to try it, simply as a preventive, just as certain surgeons make
23 out that we ought,  to avoid the risk of appendicitis later on, to have all our appendices taken out when we are
24 children.” Grief that is  caused one by a person with whom one is in love can be bitter, even when it is interpolated
25 among preoccupations,  occupations, pleasures in which that person is not directly involved and from which our
26 attention is diverted only  now and again to return to it. But when such a grief has its birth—as was now
27 happening—at a moment when the  happiness of seeing that person fills us to the exclusion of all else, the sharp
28 depression that then affects our spirits,  sunny hitherto, sustained and calm, lets loose in us a raging tempest
29 against which we know not whether we are  capable of struggling to the end.  (Proust)