Remedial English Test Series 42

         Remedial English Test Series 42

          Identify  the ONE mistake in each line and make corrections    (1 mark for each correct answer. Total score   ___ )

01 Choose  the greatest living writer is a harmless parlour game, but it might prove more than that if it provokes people into reading
02 whoever gets the call. What make  a great writer? Philosophical depth, quality of writing, range, ability to move between registers,
03 and the power to influence other writers and the age in which we live. Amis is a wonder  writer and incredibly influential. Whatever
04 people feel about his work, they must surely be impress  by its ambition and concentration. But in terms of calling him a “great”
05 writer, let’s look again in 20 years. It would be invidious for me to chose one name, but Harold Pinter, VS Naipaul, Doris Lessing,
06 Michael Longley, John Berger and Tom Stoppard would all are in the frame. (Andrew Motion) 
07   Greatness lies in either (or both) saying some that nobody has said before, or saying it in a way that no one has said it. You need
08 to be able to do something with the English language that no one else does. A great writer tells you something that appear  to
09 you to be new, but then you realise that you always knew it. Great writing should make you rethink the world, not reflect currently reality.
10 Amis writes wonder  sentences, but he writes too many wonderful sentences one after another. I met a taxi driver the other day
11 who thought that. Kazuo Ishiguro is more importance  if you look at that generation, and Lawrence Norfolk has the makings of
12 greatness – for him, a book must be a whole universe. But in truth it is far too early really to be make these pronouncements. In
13 the 60s, I would have confidently said William Golding, Iris Murdoch and Muriel Spark were the major writer, but now I hear it
14 argued that Penelope Fitzgerald was the greatest writer of her generation, and I am come round to thinking that was true. Yet we
15 didn’t think it at the time. She was very quiet, so we didn’t see how importance she was.  (Byatt) 
16 It is not ridicule  to talk of Amis as a great writer. Not all his books are great books, but he is a fine writer and ambitious in what he
17 does, and he has always like to experiment. Some of that experimentation has produced duds, but Money and his latest book,
18 House of Meetings, are real achievements. I don’t know how useful it is to put writers in competition by ask  who is Britain’s
19 greatest writer. When people do it, they usual  look for a big male writer – someone such as Amis, Salman Rushdie or Ian McEwan.
20 But why not Doris Lessing? Again, not all her book  are great books but some, such as The Golden Notebook, are and will always
21 be read. Or Zadie Smith? She is young, but what she has already achieved is extraordinary. Traditional, women have often been
22 sideline  in the competitive talk about greatness because their canvas has tended to be smaller. They have written more domestic
23 novels and dont take on the big themes so often. But no roll call of great dead British writers would be complete without Jane
24 Austen, Virginia Woolf and Charlotte Brontë, for starters. Even now, women tend not to talk themself up in the way some male
25 writers do. Smith and Sarah Waters, for instance – two super contemporary writers – always run themselves down in interviews.
26 Men tend to be much more confident about what they achieve. However many bad reviews Rushdie get, you feel he would never
27 loose the sense of his own greatness. (Natasha Walter) 

 KEY TO Remedial English Test Series 42   Note the correct answers below

01 Choosing the greatest living writer is a harmless parlour game, but it might prove more than that if it provokes people into reading
02 whoever gets the call. What makes a great writer? Philosophical depth, quality of writing, range, ability to move between registers,
03 and the power to influence other writers and the age in which we live. Amis is a wonderful writer and incredibly influential. Whatever
04 people feel about his work, they must surely be impressed by its ambition and concentration. But in terms of calling him a “great”
05 writer, let’s look again in 20 years. It would be invidious for me to choose one name, but Harold Pinter, VS Naipaul, Doris Lessing,
06 Michael Longley, John Berger and Tom Stoppard would all be in the frame. (Andrew Motion) 
07   Greatness lies in either (or both) saying something that nobody has said before, or saying it in a way that no one has said it. You need
08 to be able to do something with the English language that no one else does. A great writer tells you something that appears to
09 you to be new, but then you realise that you always knew it. Great writing should make you rethink the world, not reflect current reality.
10 Amis writes wonderful sentences, but he writes too many wonderful sentences one after another. I met a taxi driver the other day
11 who thought that. Kazuo Ishiguro is more important if you look at that generation, and Lawrence Norfolk has the makings of
12 greatness – for him, a book must be a whole universe. But in truth it is far too early really to be making these pronouncements. In
13 the 60s, I would have confidently said William Golding, Iris Murdoch and Muriel Spark were the major writers, but now I hear it
14 argued that Penelope Fitzgerald was the greatest writer of her generation, and I am coming round to thinking that was true. Yet we
15 didn’t think it at the time. She was very quiet, so we didn’t see how important she was.  (Byatt) 
16 It is not ridiculous to talk of Amis as a great writer. Not all his books are great books, but he is a fine writer and ambitious in what he
17 does, and he has always liked to experiment. Some of that experimentation has produced duds, but Money and his latest book,
18 House of Meetings, are real achievements. I don’t know how useful it is to put writers in competition by asking who is Britain’s
19 greatest writer. When people do it, they usually look for a big male writer – someone such as Amis, Salman Rushdie or Ian McEwan.
20 But why not Doris Lessing? Again, not all her books are great books but some, such as The Golden Notebook, are and will always
21 be read. Or Zadie Smith? She is young, but what she has already achieved is extraordinary. Traditionally, women have often been
22 sidelined in the competitive talk about greatness because their canvas has tended to be smaller. They have written more domestic
23 novels and don’t take on the big themes so often. But no roll call of great dead British writers would be complete without Jane
24 Austen, Virginia Woolf and Charlotte Brontë, for starters. Even now, women tend not to talk themselves up in the way some male
25 writers do. Smith and Sarah Waters, for instance – two superb contemporary writers – always run themselves down in interviews.
26 Men tend to be much more confident about what they achieve. However many bad reviews Rushdie gets, you feel he would never
27 lose the sense of his own greatness. (Natasha Walter)